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Mar 07

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When a photographer leaves his cameras behind …

Lizzy Hawker

 

Lloyd Belcher, our photographer in 2015 and 2017, is coming back in 2018. This time he is leaving the cameras behind and this is why! Good luck Lloyd!

 

“I’m very fortunate that I have a job that I enjoy and it takes me to some beautiful places around the world. But don’t be fooled, it’s bloody hard work. However, I’d rather put in the hard hours in the mountains than lecturing and marking undergraduate papers which is what I used to before changing careers. One of the most scenic races that I have worked on is the Ultra Tour Monte Rosa. I first worked on this race in 2015 and I was struck not only by the beauty of the landscapes that I was shooting images in, but also the rugged terrain that appealed to the runner in me. I ran a lot of miles on the course while shooting the race and saw how rugged and challenging that the course is. While shooting UTMR 2017 and seeing a lot of the course again, I decided that enough was enough and this is a race that I will have to run.  So for UTMR 2018, I will leave the cameras packed away somewhere as I have registered to run the 100km. See you out there.”

Lloyd Belcher, Lloyd Belcher Visuals

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Latest Posts

Aug 08

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2017 UTMR poster!

Lizzy Hawker

We have a new poster for 2017!

 

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Jan 10

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Why we ask for the experience we ask for!

Lizzy Hawker

The route of the Ultra Tour Monte Rosa is challenging! Bold, beautiful and brutal …. There are two reasons why we ask for the experience we ask for – we want you to be safe and we want you to enjoy your race experience.

It is a tough trail – high, wild and technical in places. The terrain is demanding and the weather conditions can be too. You may be exposed to snow, rain, wind, intense sunshine, heat. The weather can change quickly and you need to be prepared for everything.

Imagine you fall and twist an ankle and you are waiting for help to arrive. You are sitting on cold rocks just below a 3000m pass in the pouring rain with the wind howling. Can you look after yourself until help arrives? There is also a reasoning behind the obligatory equipment that we ask you to carry!

We are offering four different race options so that you can choose the challenge that suits your experience and aspirations.

 

Stage Races

The stage races are a wonderful way to experience the UTMR. You can race as hard as you like during the day and then enjoy the companionship of your fellow runners as you relax and recover in delightful alpine villages. With no night-time running you are able to enjoy each section of the route in daylight. The 4-day stage race covering the full tour is 40% harder than the 3-day stage race starting in Cervinia. Bear this in mind when deciding which race to enter!

We suggest prior experience of multi-stage racing on mountain terrain or completion of a mountain marathon with up to 2000m ascent within a time of 8 hours. More important than speed is the ability to look after yourself in the mountains in potentially severe weather conditions – this is why we ask if you have any previous mountain experience – this might include climbing or mountaineering, multi-day trekking, ski alpinism (not downhill piste skiing) etc.

 

Ultras

Running one of the UTMR ultras means you are going to be running during the hours of darkness, possibly for all of one or even two nights. It is essential that you are sufficiently comfortable on alpine trails to be able to cope when you are tired, your eyes are strained from trying to see in the dark and your legs are exhausted. You need to be in good physical shape and you need to be mentally prepared.

The 116km Ultra from Cervinia to Grächen is a real challenge. We ask you to have experience of a race of at least 100km on mountain trails and requiring you to run over 6 hours during darkness on rocky mountain trails (not smooth single track).

The 170km Ultra Tour making the full loop around Monte Rosa from Grächen to Grächen is a serious challenge. This is the race that I wanted to run and this is why we created the UTMR! For 2017 the number of participants is limited to 100. We ask that you have already completed one of 5 races of comparable difficulty. Note that in my opinion the UTMR is at least 30% harder than the UTMB.

“The full UTMR course is going to destroy runners that think it’s just another long run in the mountains,” said Fergus Edwards from UK who recced the new course over four days last summer. “This is not a race that you turn up at and hope to hike the ups, jog the downs, and make it back tired but inside the cutoffs. Two key reasons: firstly, the ascents and descents are longer and steeper than other races; secondly, the terrain is very technical with boulder fields and narrow paths clinging to steep mountain slopes.”

 

Please choose the event that gives you a challenge appropriate to your experience.  If you have any questions then please do get in touch and we hope to welcome you in September!

 

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Jul 02

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The Tour

Lizzy Hawker

TourMonteRosa-running-camp-01731

Traditional Walser house in a hamlet above Alagna!

 

True, Ultra Tour Monte Rosa is only in its second year as an organized running event, but the long-distance hiking route around the Monte Rosa massif has been trod by people for quite a while previous to this. Wild and high and ridiculously scenic as it is, it’s punctuated by signs of habitation—vestiges of ancient paved paths and isolated villages—all along the way. Rather than marring the wilderness, these manmade landmarks only add to the variety and historical context of this unique trail.

Parts of the TMR have been employed as trade routes since some rough-dressed folks left behind stone tools, so it’s kind of surprising that the whole 100-ish mile circuit wasn’t actually connected for hiking purposes until 1994. As such, the entire circumnavigation is usually an eight- or nine-day itinerary. The route, which has some variants, was designed with both practical logistics and views in mind, so it made perfect sense to follow the existing trail rather than devising something just for the purposes of the race—no need to remake the wheel.

Photographer and writer Alex Roddie hiked TMR in 2015, following in the 1842 footsteps of Professor James Forbes, who Roddie admired. Roddie noted in his blog prior to the journey:

“The Tour du Mont Blanc is a very popular long-distance hike in the Alps, looping around Mont Blanc, but the circumnavigation of Monte Rosa is less frequented. Both routes are approximately 100 miles in length. However, the relative unpopularity of the TMR – and its more severe elevation profile, featuring numerous major ascents and descents – make this route the more serious proposition.

The main challenge here is the brutal elevation profile. … I’ve climbed plenty of 3,000m and 4,000m peaks so am quite happy with climbs like this, but I’ve never done so many day after day before. What the TMR lacks in wildness it makes up for in physical difficulty.”

Starting in Cervinia and proceeding counter-clockwise on the Italian side of the massif, you’ll cross back into Switzerland at Monte Moro Pass, finishing in the umlauted town of Grächen. This year, the route does not include the highest point on the whole circuit, 3,900-some-odd meter Theodul Pass. If you feel cheated by this, you have options for restitution: Sign up for UTMR’s Grachen-Cervinia hike extension, simply keep running from Grachen, or sign on for UTMR again in 2017 when it will cover the full monte. Ha.

While UTMR ultra runners will experience the cultural variations between the Italian, Swiss and small Germanic Walser communities at a brisk clip, there are some clues that can be appreciated at 8-minute pace

If there is pasta at the aid station and the caffe only has milk in it between the hours of 6 am and noon, you’re in Italy.

If there is rosti (a potato fritter) and chocolate on the table, you’ve crossed into Switzerlan

Gressoney la Trinité, Alagna and Macugnaga are traditional Walser communities along the route. If there is beer and ham on the refreshment table, it is culturally sensitive to eat and drink quite a lot.

 

Faces. On a doorway in Saas Fee!

Faces. On a doorway in Saas Fee!

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Jun 15

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They think you can do it too!

Lizzy Hawker

Words by Sarah Barker.

I was rude and inquired the age of two finishers of the 2015 UTMR. Like most things, Roger and Bridget took my impertinence in stride, shared their experiences and gave some tips. Prepare to be blown away and inspired. In their own words…

Roger is 70 and Im 64. We have only just got into mountain running in the last few years.Last year I think we did 18 running events (about 12 were ultras) and a couple of mountain bike events, too. We both entered the World Mountain Running Championships last year, just for fun. That hurt…a lot!

We are all about the adventure and big open spaces, so what better race to do than UTMR….a new event is always very exciting. It was tough and I swore (quite a lot actually) that I would never ever do it again! But you could feel the love Lizzy had for the area and we found that infectious—she has so much soul. It was just so wonderful, we had to go back again. We’ve signed up for 2016, and have managed to persuade a few friends to do it too.

Lizzy greeting Bridget at the finish line in Grächen.

Lizzy greeting Bridget at the finish line in Grächen.

After the UTMR last year we went along to soak up the UTMB atmosphere in Chamonix and we just found it all too big and impersonal, so doubtful we would consider it, even if we could get in. We were both signed up for Transvulcania this year. I was ill but Roger finished the 84k fun run—he had a strong run. We are both doing the V3K in Wales in a couple of weeks.”

Roger added: “As Bridge said, we tend to avoid big international events— there is often a ballot for places and cost is a factor too, since we have retired in order to have more playtime. We have never enjoyed road running, choosing to run events like 10 Peaks, Lakeland 50, GL3D, Coast2Coast, or simply exploring the moors and hills when we are in the UK, or covering 3500 km on mountain bikes in New Zealand in 2011. That was really the catalyst that resulted in us giving up work for adventure. UTMR 2015 was a perfect opportunity to run in the Alps and Lizzy organised such a good event, we have to return in 2016.”

I asked Bridget and Roger to share some tips for those who question whether they’re up for the UTMR challenge…

I would say to anyone who was concerned about the distance that they should do the stage event [rather than the ultra], and if two old duffers can do it, anybody can. The altitude wasn’t really a problem but the right shoes are very important—there is quite a lot of technical stuff and you want to be able to trust your shoes. I would also like to add that you have to know what you are capable of—nothing worse than a panic attack on a route that’s too technical.”

Bridget and Roger on Day 1 in 2015.

Bridget and Roger on Day 1 in 2015.

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Jun 12

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Reading. Running and reading.

Lizzy Hawker

Words by Sarah Barker.

I’ve observed that runners read. This is strictly anecdotal, and scientific rigor could easily prove me wrong, but I find that when runners return from seven or eight hours of scissoring the pins, they like to have a knees up. Because they are obsessive multitaskers, reading ensues. Next day, they’ve got great ghastly miles of thinks about what they read, and the cycle continues.

Kilian Jornet's reading shelf!

Kilian Jornet’s reading shelf!

 

They might like to read about the Monte Rosa region which they will be trotting through in September, for context. (Thank goodness, we’ve arrived at the point of this missive.)  Well, running readers, here’s a very short list of Monte Rosa-related material that will provide at least 116 kilometers of things to think about.

The story of Ulrich Inderbinen, the oldest Alpine guide. Two ways to enjoy this icon of alpinism—in a brief but entertaining Alpine Journal article, or the more thorough biography mentioned in the article, Ulrich Inderbinen: As old as the century. Inderbinen lived and worked around the Monte Rosa massif through the age of 95, passing away in 2004 at age 103. He was known for his professionalism, unerring mountain skills, impeccable manners, and dry humor.

Ulrich Inderbinnen, still a mountain guide until the age of 97, 5 years before he died!

Ulrich Inderbinnen, still a mountain guide until the age of 97, 5 years before he died!

Alone In The Alps, by James Lasdun. This lengthy article that appeared recently in the New Yorker describes the eight-country Via Alpina which actually skirts the Monte Rosa region. But the terrain and unfolding long-distance trail experiences Lasdun relates are very similar to those you’ll find at UTMR. Particularly resonant is this description of the cultural variety in each new valley: “The Rockies may offer wilder wildernesses, but you don’t experience the pleasure of sharp cultural variegation as you move from place to place. In the Alps, it’s still present in the shifting styles of church towers, village fountains, sheepcotes, hay barns. It’s there in the odd bits of language that filter through even if you’re an incurable monoglot like me. (How nice it is to learn that the German word for the noise cowbells make is Gebimmel, and that the Swiss-Romanche word for “boulder” is crap.) It’s there in the restaurant menus: daubes giving way to dumplings, raclette to robiola; and in the freshly incomprehensible road signs, which in Slovenia are clotted with impenetrable consonant clusters, as if vowels were an indulgence.”

Cowbells. Not so dissimilar to those distributed as prizes at UTMB!

Cowbells. Not so dissimilar to those distributed as prizes at UTMB!

Mr Noon, by D.H. Lawrence. Started in 1920, abandoned in 1921, and finally published in 1984, Lawrence’s novel is largely autobiographical. Most relevant to this list is the second part of the book that describes the main character’s elopement and subsequent romantic tramping through the Alps with his lover. Holds promise on a number of levels.

I’d like to point out, I am receiving no kickback for this listing whatsoever: Runner: a short story about a long run, by Lizzy Hawker. If you want to reach way back to the very origins of UTMR, you’ll find the answer here. Lizzy’s love of mountains was planted, nurtured and flowered in the high meadows and craggy peaks of the Monte Rosa massif. You’ll get to know both the UTMR director and the high passes and dark valleys that inspired her—directly applicable, no imagination required.

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Jun 03

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A volunteer’s view – meet Keith Byrne

Lizzy Hawker

Words by Sarah Barker

As race volunteers go, you could do a lot worse than Keith Byrne. Super-chipper at dark-thirty in the morning? Eternal summer of the feet? Ah yes, that Keith Byrne.
Byrne’s job at last year’s UTMR was to brief runners in the morning, then scurry quick to the finish line and get that ready, all with minimal direction. Oh, and being more outgoing than the rest of the race staff put together, Keith was nominated to be the MC at the prize-giving, or as he put it, “I got to be the MC.”

 

Dressed for daily morning briefing. Keith and his "solid #thenorthface protection look" and #mountainchic as demonstrated by the oldest mountain guide in Gressoney!

Dressed for daily morning briefing. Keith and his solid #thenorthface protection look and #mountainchic as demonstrated by the oldest mountain guide in Gressoney!

 

One of Keith’s favorite moments was sartorial in nature: “The special guest to start the race was the oldest mountain guide in Gressoney. He was dressed in traditional local clothing and looked incredibly smart. Stood alongside him was myself, in a down jacket, shorts and flip flops. The contrast was immense.”

Some other observations he made are:

– Monte Rosa is a mountain paradise that not enough trail runners have ever experienced

– Stage racing is the perfect balance between racing and sheer enjoyment

– Lizzy and her team are brilliant and will do everything in their power to give you the best experience

– If you can’t race but want to be part of this special event, then volunteering is an equally brilliant experience

 

That really narrows down the number of excuses not to participate in UTMR 2016 now, doesn’t it?  I’m going to finish off what Keith has started by saying that he’s pointed his flip-flops toward Cervinia, has taken off work, booked his ticket, and is working on some crowd-pleasing jokes for this year’s prize-giving. Go ahead—try to resist that!

 

Keith welcoming a happy finisher to Macugnaga on Day 2 in 2015.

Keith welcoming a happy finisher to Macugnaga on Day 2 in 2015.

 

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Jun 02

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The optimism of spring

Lizzy Hawker

Today is the 1st June already but everything is still possible. Registrations are open until July 1st – sign up now!

 

Words by Sarah Barker

All things seem possible in May.”

I might have said that, after a few beers, but naturalist, photographer and writer Edwin Way Teale said it first.

On the face of it, Teale’s quote speaks to the general optimism of spring. But upon further research, I’m startled to discover Teale is actually entreating trail runners to carpe the diem and sign up for the ultimate in communes with nature—Ultra Tour Monte Rosa. This is esoteric stuff—let me explain.

Teale, born in 1899 in Illinois, found his passion early on, at age nine, and shortly after, discovered you can’t just be a naturalist (see also: undergraduate degree in psychology), you have to be a writer, photographer and a naturalist. Very much a fan of Thoreau, Teale also built a log cabin out back of his real house which provided the necessary rustic atmosphere for his writing. But unlike Thoreau, he made his mark via an epic road trip through the US, described in four books—North With The Spring, Journey Into Summer, Autumn Across America, and Wandering Through Winter. This series won him a Pulitzer Prize for Non-Fiction in 1966.

Teale loved a journey, quietly observing the small and the grand, and though his death in 1980 prevented him from experiencing the wonders of nature in an ultra race format, one feels his quote about May possibilities is brilliantly prescient.

Experiencing the wonders of nature in ultra race format!

Experiencing the wonders of nature in ultra race format!

 

So yes, all things seem possible in May, but don’t sit around meditating in your log cabin. Sign up and hit the trails, oh children of nature.

 

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May 27

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Happy Finishers

Lizzy Hawker

Words by Sarah Barker

So, the knee’s acting up again, or there was that frantic spot at work such that your training was reduced to the round-trip hike between desk and water cooler, and, well, you’re a bit unsure of your fitness. And particularly as it applies to the (ridiculously scenic) 116K of Ultra Tour Monte Rosa. It’s something to think about, isn’t it?

Before you cross into overthinking territory, we’d like to share this pep talk from happy finisher of the 2015 staged edition of UTMR, Wendy Dodd:

“A good point…was that with few exceptions the race was an achievable goal for most entrants. As you know some of the ‘tough’ race organisers pride themselves on a high number of drop-outs, equating this with the ‘quality’ of the race.  But to have a race over the TMR with a completion [rate] of 105/118 is exceptional… The stage race and the small numbers made it more enjoyable for me.  I think it is a far more scenic route than UTMB [Ultra Trail du Mont-Blanc] and I have already got a number of friends interested in it for next year!”

Wendy Dodds during the 2015 edition!

Wendy Dodds during the 2015 edition!

 

Wow, thanks for that Wendy! Like to point out that completion rate again—105 of 118 people, some of whose knees were not 100 percent  during training, took the challenge and are glad they did. There’s something to think about.

 

 

An early morning start in 2015!

An early morning start in 2015!

 

RunWithMe creator, editor, and chief bottle washer Ari Veltman signed up for last year’s zero edition UTMR less than a month prior to the event. I recently asked him to share some of his memories, and he pointed me to his Facebook review that starts out, “I have not been asked to write this, and actually the organizers have no idea that this is coming.”  

Please note the date on that post is August 26, 2015. So you can read Ari’s completely unsolicited review at the link here, as well as his thoughts that were, in fact, solicited and like a sort of good wine, have aged about 9 months.

Almost 3000m - Ari and volunteers at one high checkpoint!

Almost 3000m – Ari and volunteers at one high checkpoint! © Ari Veltman

 

Says Ari:

“One of the things that captured my attention immediately was Lizzy’s responsiveness and care.

I only found out about the event less than a month before the start, and sent an email through the website to see if it might be still relevant. Someone named Lizzy (I had no idea who she was at the time) answered very quickly, and in the following days was super responsive and helpful. Knowing that someone is there and cares was the first very strong green light I got – and I just knew it was going to be a great event.

If there is one thing that made a deep lasting impression on me, it would be the volunteers.

I have been to a number of races around the world, and the volunteers in UTMR — both locals and runners that came over to participate as volunteers — really made a huge difference. They really cared, and encouraged in a way I did not have the chance to witness in other events. It made the event really special for me. I was actually so thankful for the way they supported and cheered for us that, following the event, I decided I wanted to give back, and participated as a volunteer myself for the first time at the Mount Fuji race.

 

The checkpoint at Rifugio Ferraro in 2015!

The checkpoint at Rifugio Ferraro in 2015!

 

Food! I just loved the food at the aid stations

It can make such a big difference. I specifically remember making a huge stop at the mid-point aid station of the second day (or was it the third day?). I arrived at this small town in the mountains, and there was this huge buffet table – full of local cheese and ham, sweets and cakes of all sorts. I remember I stopped there for more than 30 minutes, took my time, made sandwiches, had some tea, and made sure I sampled every cake that was there. Took me a while to start running again after that …

Checkpoint food! © Anthony Hayes

Checkpoint food! © Anthony Hayes

 

The views in UTMR are really amazing  

The fact that a course in the Alps has nice views is not a surprise, but I remember being quite amazed that the views kept changing so rapidly, and you kept finding out new amazing views after each turn. This is why when I got lost on the first day, and added another couple of hours to my running I was very happy, thinking I had the chance to get some extra views in for my money. The whole area is just that beautiful, that you are happy to get lost and get a few extra miles in.”

 

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May 23

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Krissy Moehl’s memories

Lizzy Hawker

Words by Sarah Barker.

Women’s runner up of last year’s zero edition, Krissy Moehl, has plenty of trail racing experience—multiple UTMB finishes and two Hardrocks to name a few. Here are some things that made UTMR special for her:

“The route, when done as a single-stage ultra, will be more challenging than UTMB—more technical trails, burlier climbs and descents, and the views more dramatic. I would say it will be on par with Hardrock.

“The stage race format was wonderful because you got to see it all, since you only ran during daylight. The camaraderie that developed, gathering every morning for breakfast and every evening for dinner—there was much more opportunity to get to know people, and that was really fun.

Happy Krissy at the finish line in Grächen!

Happy Krissy at the finish line in Grächen!

“Lizzy did a really good job of rallying the troops, of knowing her strengths and being able to pull in other people for all the other details that come up. She’s good at putting together a super tough course, and knowing what runners need, like confidence markers along way, volunteers at strategic spots, great aid stations. We made fun of her because she’s so quiet, not much for public speaking, but she recruited a great team to do those things.

“After the second day of running, about 12 of us were hanging out in this town square waiting for our luggage. We were putting our legs in the fountain to ice them, just sitting in the sun, eating focaccia bread and snacks, and watching runners come in. It was a great afternoon!

In the village fountain!

In the village fountain!

“It was cool to see how much involvement there was from the towns we passed through. They hosted an awards ceremony and gave these beautiful bowls as gifts. There were fans along the course—the towns are really into it.”

 

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